Tag Archives: Diversity

A Morning Blessing

8 Sep

[Rabbi Jonathan Freirich delivered this on Friday, August 29 with the wonderful people of the Transfaith Conference here in Charlotte, NC]

אֱלֹהַי, נְשָׁמָה שֶׁנָּתַתָּ בִּי טְהוֹרָה הִיא

My God, the soul you have given me is pure.

As we look out upon this day, among these beautiful people around us, let us acknowledge the shining purity and beauty of the spirits we find around us this morning.

Let us revel in the light that we bring to each other and share with one another.

In Jewish traditions we begin our mornings in gratitude – first for our bodies, may they work well enough so that we can offer praise and thanks. Then we notice that our spirits still reside within us, and that that essence is pure, and we celebrate the return of our souls into our bodies after that absent time during our slumbers.

Each morning we look out upon the world and offer up gratitude because a day that begins with gratitude is a better day. A day that we transform with words of thanks in turn transforms us into grateful people.

I am so grateful to be among all of you today.

So I offer you another blessing from the opening prayers of a Jewish morning service:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם, שֶׁעָשַׂנִי בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים

Praised are You, the Infinite source of a miraculous creation, who made me, and all of us, in the divine image.

Each and every one of us here today reflects another gorgeous facet of the image of the divine. To be in the image of the infinite is to be infinitely varied.

Let us begin our day in praise of the purity of our inner spirits, and in awe of the beautiful variety of our outward appearances.

Let our time together be filled with soulful beauty, and pure diversity, and let us say: Amein.

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Gems in the Torah – for Charlotte Pride

12 Aug

Gems in the Torah, by Rabbi Jonathan Freirich

Message for Interfaith Worship Service “Treasured Jewels, Reflections of the Divine”

Sunday, August 10, 4:00 PM, Caldwell Presbyterian Church

Some comments inspired by Deuteronomy, Chapter 4:15-19a:

“Now keep close watch over your selves – for you did not see any image on the day that God spoke to you at Horev from the midst of the fire –  lest you wreak-ruin by making yourselves a carved form of any figure, the pattern of male or female, the pattern of any animal that is on earth, the pattern of any winged bird that flies in the heavens, the pattern of any crawling-thing on the soil, the pattern of any fish that is in the waters beneath the earth or lest you lift up your eyes toward the heavens and see the sun and the moon and the stars, all the forces of the heavens, and be lured-away to bow down yourselves to them and worship them…”

These verses, from the Torah reading yesterday [Saturday, August 9], warn us against idolatry.

“Oh yawn rabbi, more about idolatry – really, who is worried about praying to statues?” I can hear you all thinking that, and why not? What possible relevance could this ancient prohibition of Judaism, one enthusiastically included in Christianity  through the Ten Commandments, have for us today, as we celebrate the opening of Pride?

We do still suffer in the throes of idol-worship. Only our idols are far more sinister and subtle now than ever. Body-image, gender-image, heterosexism, and homophobia – these are forms of idolatry. They take a graven image, usually one air-brushed, or unrealistically depicted without nuance, or one constructed out of fear of the beauty of diversity and complexity in humanity, and hold it up as one we should all aim for.

Let us not “wreak-ruin” upon ourselves by holding up any carved form in the pattern of male or female as one that we must all universally adhere to!

We must instead embrace the idea of God from these verses as beyond depiction. We must remember the poetry of identifying our humanity as a reflection of that form that cannot be described, that infinite within each of us, and burst open those graven images and instead see in each other the jeweled facets of holiness, the depth and beauty of something that can never be captured in a piece of sculpture, art, or photograph. We cannot be contained in a graven image.

When we gaze upon our selves and each other with reverence, seeing in one another the beauty that comes from a reflection of God’s infinite diversity, we get to stand in awe of our shared humanity. In doing this we fulfill another sparkling jewel of wisdom from yesterday’s scriptural reading:

Deut. 4:29 “But when you seek Adonai your God from there, you will find God, if you search for God with all your heart and with all your being.”

A key aspect to avoiding the pitfalls of idolatry is to avoid complacency – we must continue to seek with all our hearts and all our beings. When we don’t understand someone, when we are frustrated by someone’s actions, when we feel hurt or wronged, yes, we must stand up for justice, and even more, we must seek in the object of our difficulty for their humanity. When we go beyond the conflict and connect on the grounds of our infinitely varied humanity, we offer others that opportunity too.

In this we see that seeking that divine spark within all people, within even all things, gives us this opportunity to overcome the complacency of idolatry, that thinking that says, “I know what I need to know.” Let us accept that our knowledge can always be expanded so that we can continually search for greater insights into the people around us.

One more shining thought from this biblical selection. Moses reminded the People of Israel that:

Deut. 5:2-3 “Our God cut with us a covenant at Horev/Sinai. Not with our ancestors did God cut this covenant, but with us, yes, us, those here today, all of us (that are) alive!”

We are all responsible for upholding the good teachings of our multitude of teachers.

We are all part of a contract between us and creation – to see deeply into our surroundings and celebrate the facets of the divine in everyone and everything.

Each of us contributes, and each of us plays a part.

As we celebrate our Queen City’s Pride this year, the crown jewel of Charlotte, shine up the faces of our gems, share them with each other, and take moments to notice even the diamonds in the rough.

We all get to shimmer together with Pride.

gems
Image source: http://www.earthstreasury.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/FB-6413-3.jpg

Help Charlotte’s Jewish Students Get a Teacher Work Day for Rosh HaShanah

10 Jan

For those of you who live in Charlotte, please help to make Rosh Hashanah a teacher workday on September 5, 2013. It will make a huge difference to our hundreds and hundreds of Beth El students who want to attend synagogue on the High Holy Days. For just this week, until January 14th, CMS is polling parents, students and general community members for input. Calendar Option A observes Thursday, September 5, 2013 (the first day of Rosh Hashanah) as a Teacher Workday. After the polling period ends, Superintendent Heath Morrison will review the results and evaluate comments to decide whether to recommend a revised calendar to the Board of Education.

Regardless of your personal connection to CMS schools, all community members are encouraged to vote and support our Jewish students and families at CMS. To see the calendars and then vote go to: http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/mediaroom/calendars/Pages/2013-2014CommunityCalendarPoll.aspx

Torah thought a day – Noach

22 Aug

A thought a day on each of the Torah readings of the year continues – parashat ha-yom!

For today, Noach, the second parashah of the Torah – instead of looking at the story of Noah, let’s look at the other big occurrence in this section, the Tower of Babel, and God’s response to the humans all working together to “build a name for themselves”:

Gen. 11:6 Adonai said: Here, (they are) one people with one language for them all, and this is merely the first of their doings – now there will be no barrier for them in all that they scheme to do!
7 Come-now! Let us go down and there let us baffle their language, so that no man will understand the language of his neighbor.
8 So Adonai scattered them from there over the face of all the earth, and they had to stop building the city.
(Translation from the Schocken Bible)

What’s the Elul lesson in this teaching? God loves diversity! Progress comes from each of us recognizing our unique assets and challenging ourselves to get along and work together despite our differences.